loves art history

“We don't see things as they are, we see them as we are.”

Anaïs Nin

K A T N I S S   E V E R D E E N

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Nike, We Heart It
Sanctuary
We Heart It
A Fairytale of Photos op We Heart It

Dying Abel, by Giovanni Dupre (1817/1882, Italy), at The Hermitage.

inebriatedpony:

     No one before Bernini had managed to make marble so carnal. In his nimble hands it would flatter and stream, quiver and sweat. His figures weep and shout, their torses twist and run, and arch themselves in spasms of intense sensation. He could, like an alchemist, change one material into another - marble into trees, leaves, hair, and, of course, flesh.  
     -   Simon Schama’s Power of Art. Bernini

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voyeurchic:

Every woman wants a love letter to read and re-read.

voyeurchic:

Every woman wants a love letter to read and re-read.

(Source: ballerina67, via sirloin)

0ueen:

La Renommée retenant Pégase, Palais Garnier, Paris. Eugène Louis Lequesne

0ueen:

La Renommée retenant Pégase, Palais Garnier, Paris. Eugène Louis Lequesne

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theartistsmanifesto:

detail of Laocoon and His Sons

theartistsmanifesto:

detail of Laocoon and His Sons

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ollebosse:

Auguste Rodin - Il sogno (Il bacio dell’angelo) (c. 1905)

ollebosse:

Auguste Rodin - Il sogno (Il bacio dell’angelo) (c. 1905)

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necspenecmetu:

Daniele da Volterra, David and Goliath, c. 1550-6

necspenecmetu:

Daniele da Volterra, David and Goliath, c. 1550-6

(via sirloin)

italianartsociety:

Raphael died on this day in 1520 in Rome, likely his thirty-seventh birthday (unless, in fact, he was born on 28 March). Born in Urbino in 1483, Raphael first learned the art of painting from his father Giovanni Santi. He continued his training and artistic development with Pietro Perugino and his student Bernardo Pinturricchio. He was in Florence by 1504 where he was active painting portraits and devotional works for elite patrons like Agnolo Doni. He moved to Rome in 1508 to enter the service of Pope Julius II alongside Michelangelo and Donato Bramante. In Rome he found great success as a fresco painter, antiquarian, and architect and ran a large and highly productive workshop.  His unexpected and early death was a great loss to the art world. Vasari recounts how Pope Leo X wept upon hearing the news and that "When this noble craftsman died, the art of painting might well have died also, seeing that when he closed his eyes, she was left as it were blind." Raphael received the utmost honor of burial in the Roman Pantheon and is widely recognized as one of the most important artists of the Italian Renaissance.

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